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by A-R
Fri Jul 23, 2010 1:08 pm
Forum: "How To" Tips
Topic: Heat stippling
Replies: 22
Views: 21376

Re: Heat stippling

lowonair wrote:
austinrealtor wrote:
lowonair wrote:how long did it take to do the stippling? any pics of how much you sanded off the front and back? did you sand the sides befor doing this? i have a 2.5 gen g36 that i want to try this on.
I've since done my G27 too (actually sold this G22). The G27 took about an hour start to finish. G22 about 90 minutes because slightly larger and two patterns. The G27 is newer so the side panel patterns were still in good shape and left them alone.

The sanding was fairly minimal - sanded off the raised peaks that form the finger "grooves", then just sanded the original front and back texture to smooth it a bit and leave it roughly same level as the corners, if that makes sense. This just makes it easier to make a uniform pattern with the soldering iron/woodburner tip.

so on the back of the grip you dont sand the texture completely off? seems to me that would take too much off the structure of the polymer. i'm just worried about the little raised grooves on the front and rear and how to do those areas.
I never go any "deeper" than the base layer of the grip "under" the OEM texture if that makes sense. Take a look at this photo again.

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I remove the "bumps" or ridges which form the finger grooves. After that, I sand down slightly the little raised square texture slightly - just enough so that it is uniform enough when I start doing the point & drag stippling effect. I never even get close to that base layer of polymer you see beneath the little square texture nubs.

And caveat for ALL of this is of course that I'm not even mediocre a garage gunsmith and certainly not certified or accredited or in any way whatsoever an "expert" in any of this. Follow my directions at your own risk. Knock on wood, this has worked for me so far.
by A-R
Thu Jul 22, 2010 6:40 pm
Forum: "How To" Tips
Topic: Heat stippling
Replies: 22
Views: 21376

Re: Heat stippling

lowonair wrote:how long did it take to do the stippling? any pics of how much you sanded off the front and back? did you sand the sides befor doing this? i have a 2.5 gen g36 that i want to try this on.
I've since done my G27 too (actually sold this G22). The G27 took about an hour start to finish. G22 about 90 minutes because slightly larger and two patterns. The G27 is newer so the side panel patterns were still in good shape and left them alone.

The sanding was fairly minimal - sanded off the raised peaks that form the finger "grooves", then just sanded the original front and back texture to smooth it a bit and leave it roughly same level as the corners, if that makes sense. This just makes it easier to make a uniform pattern with the soldering iron/woodburner tip.
by A-R
Wed May 05, 2010 9:36 pm
Forum: "How To" Tips
Topic: Heat stippling
Replies: 22
Views: 21376

Re: Heat stippling

Well I finally made the plunge and heat stippled an old cop trade-in Glock 22. This was my final test before doing the same to my Glock 27 (and probably my G23 later on).

I think it turned out well. Sanded off the front finger grooves, then sanded down the existing grip texture on front and back. Also sanded a bit away from under the trigger guard where the middle finger rests. Used the point-n-pull teardrop technique on the front and back straps, and one of the patterned screw heads for the sides. It was a little aggressive on the side that presses against my body while carrying IWB so I sanded it heavily with a Dremel "abrasive buff" tip 180 grit (like this one ... http://www.dremel.com/en-us/Attachments ... x?pid=511E" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;) and now it's very comfortable.

Put 50 rounds through the gun and I really like the way it feels when shooting. Not too much, just enough grip. And MUCH better than the factory grip texture.

Photos showing my handiwork next to a standard Glock.

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by A-R
Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:46 pm
Forum: "How To" Tips
Topic: Heat stippling
Replies: 22
Views: 21376

Heat stippling

So I've started experimenting with heat stippling, hoping to build up the nerve and skill to stipple my Glocks. So far I have done a bunch of test patterns on a pair of Glock mag loaders, and just this week stippled both a standard AR-15 grip and a new Magpul MOE grip. See photos of standard AR-15 grip below.

I've tried a bunch of different techniques, including those explained in this link:
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=421415" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I now have 6 or 7 screw heads all cut into waffle-like patterns as described in link above. This works reasonably well. But I've since found that I like the results of the point-n-drag method better. This is done by pressing a rounded soldering iron tip into the polymer briefly, then dragging it down and lifting away. This produces the upside-down tear drop effect you see in the photos below. Used a standard Weller soldering iron I had laying around the garage with the screw head techniques. But for the tear drop technique I ended up buying a Weller "woodburning" iron from Sears because it had a lot of tips (including some that look just like the homemade screw head tips). Only downside is the screw threads for the two different Weller irons or different size (oh well). But now have two different irons to play around with.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1260 ... 921x00003a" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Anyway, I'd be interested to hear anyone else's experience, tips, stories regarding this polymer-frame customizing.

Hopefully I'll work up the nerve to try this on my ol' Glock 22 LEO trade-in gun soon.




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