okay.. this is for all the networking guru's

Most of us are not "computer people" so post your technical questions and comments here. If you have computer or Internet expertise, share it here.

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Russell
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#16

Post by Russell » Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:49 pm

A foolproof (from what I can tell) method of making sure that nobody gets on your wireless network that isn't intended to is:

A. Use WPA instead of WEP encryption

B. Use MAC address filtering lists.

Only allow your own MAC addresses to connect to your wireless network.

Problem solved ;)


cyphur
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#17

Post by cyphur » Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:56 pm

that will work against everyone except the most determined hackers. there are always ways to get your MAC, even if you think its fool proof. spoofing them are not hard either, there are some cards out there commercially that include that feature now.

thats why i say to log EVERYTHING, because then when your feet are to the fire, at least you can prove it wasn't you.


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Russell
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#18

Post by Russell » Thu Jul 20, 2006 5:18 pm

Yeah now that I remember the MAC addresses are included in the packets being routed back and forth.

Oh well :)


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Russell
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#19

Post by Russell » Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:39 pm

thought you guys would find it interesting to know that i went ahead and took one of the routers out of the configuration and replaced it with a switch. it now maps drives without any problems.

weird :S but glad it works now :D

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Crossfire
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#20

Post by Crossfire » Fri Aug 04, 2006 9:22 pm

You have now passed Lesson 1 of Networking 101. "Never place more than 1 router in the same subnet."


Tom
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#21

Post by Tom » Fri Aug 04, 2006 9:41 pm

llwatson wrote:You have now passed Lesson 1 of Networking 101. "Never place more than 1 router in the same subnet."
Never say never.
We used many pairing configs that had two routers on the same subnet. It all depends on need.
In other words, use only as many as you /need/.

Kind Regards, from a time when I actually cared about this stuff.
A long time ago.

Tom


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I might take a crack at this.

#22

Post by jhutto » Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:45 am

Well, It would certainly be a best practice to use 1 router. There is obviously already a cable connecting the two, so keep the wireless router. Unplug the other and plug it into the DSL "modem". I wouldnt use DMZ just forward the ports you need to the static IP addess of the server. As far as connecting to shares accross the internet, you should just setup a VPN connection on that 2003 server you have. That will solve any port issues you have with your ISP.

Otherwise if you want to to be silly and keep both you can put them on different subnets to make things more logical. This would be the second best option. Make one on 192.168.1.x, and the other 192.168.24.x for example. It would make more since to assign a static IP to the second router and disable DHCP on the first. Just forward the needed ports accross both routers to the server.

Accullay the way it is setup (as described) would really not be an issue, as there are no machines connected to the first router, and therefore no IP-address conflicts. the only thing is if your second router is obtaining an IP via DHCP, your DMZ setting will be useless after it renews it's IP addresss. . It is a bit silly to have it configured the way you do however.
I do not believe your hardware configuration has anything to do with your connectivity issues.

Hope this helps.


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#23

Post by HerbM » Sat Feb 17, 2007 4:34 am

Sorry folks I just joined and would have been happy to help with this.

There is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING wrong with two routers in a network;
The Internet is a "just a network" and it has millions -- really.

It usually does require a bit of configuration for the "router in the middle" because this is really what I teach my students is the "three router problem"*.

Why 3? Because the ISP's router counts as on, when you have two more you have a total of 3 and one of them is "in the middle". That is the router that needs a STATIC route added to find the (sub)net behind the "edge router".

Static routes will solve the multiple router problem up to a handful or maybe a dozen routers and then Dynamic Routing becomes a near requirement just for sanity.

After you get routing to work there is also the issue of "filtering" (e.g., firewalls) but that may be the case with (true) switches and all sorts of devices.
HerbM

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RPBrown
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#24

Post by RPBrown » Sat Feb 17, 2007 8:52 am

Okay ya'll made this old mans head hurt.
As far as computers go, turn it on, type on it, if it don't work call one of my kids that will make it work.

There, problem solved. Call your kids to do it. LOL
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