Jerry Patterson speaks out

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seamusTX
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Jerry Patterson speaks out

#1

Post by seamusTX » Tue Jul 10, 2007 12:43 pm

http://news.galvestondailynews.com/stor ... 13b34450ab

This starts out off-topic, but bear with me.

Texas law waives tuition at state colleges to veterans, which is great. But the law applies only to people who were U.S. citizens and Texas residents at the time they enlisted.

Mr. Patterson thinks every veteran should be eligible. (I agree.)

He goes on to explain
Jerry Patterson wrote:When I authored the Texas Concealed Handgun Law, I ensured that it allowed permits to be granted to legal permanent residents as well as citizens. I did so because I believe the right to bear arms is a constitutional right that applies to every legal resident, whether or not they have achieved citizen status. After all, they are in America by choice, rather than by accident of birth.

By the same token, I believe the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment also applies in this case.
- Jim


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#2

Post by Mage34 » Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:27 pm

I kind of wish they would change it to any veteran who is now a resident. Just becouse I hadn't found Texas till after I got out. Oh well I personaly also think if you can join the service and make it to honorable discharge that means you ARE a US citizen.......
You can still drill threw glass........

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#3

Post by ELB » Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:24 pm

Hmmm, Seamus, I am not sure you are completely correct about "Mr. Patterson thinks every veteran should be eligible."

As I read the article, Mr. Patterson seems to be saying that this law is intended to apply to veterans who are legal "green-card" holders AND Texas residents at the time they entered service. This is not the same as waiving tuition and fees for ALL veterans, regardless of where they entered service, who are NOW Texas residents.

For example, me. I entered service in 1982 in another state, became a Texas resident in 1998, and retired here in 2005. Currently I am not eligible for free tuition because I was not a Texas resident at the time I entered service. It seems to me that when Mr. Patterson is referring to "Texas veterans" he means people who were Texans first and veterans later (as opposed to me, who did it the other way around).

The one paragraph that gives me hope that it's ME that's wrong is when he talks about the Veterans Land Board and the cemetaries. I AM eligible for those, so maybe he really does mean guys like me would fall under whatever change to the law he proposes. Would be fine by me! :grin:

elb


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#4

Post by KBCraig » Wed Jul 11, 2007 1:05 am

If anyone gets all excited thinking Texas vets get to go to college for free, you should know this only picks up tuition and some fees after the vet has exhausted all VA and GI Bill resources.

It's the Hazelwood Amendment.

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#5

Post by seamusTX » Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:24 am

ELB wrote:Hmmm, Seamus, I am not sure you are completely correct about "Mr. Patterson thinks every veteran should be eligible."

As I read the article, Mr. Patterson seems to be saying that this law is intended to apply to veterans who are legal "green-card" holders AND Texas residents at the time they entered service. This is not the same as waiving tuition and fees for ALL veterans, regardless of where they entered service, who are NOW Texas residents.
I can't tell. Mr. Patterson does not give specific language for proposed legislation, so we can only guess or ask him.

Personally, I think education is a good investment for the person who receives it and for the state. People with college education earn more money and pay more taxes. They are less likely to need state services.

- Jim


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#6

Post by Will938 » Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:08 am

KBCraig wrote:If anyone gets all excited thinking Texas vets get to go to college for free, you should know this only picks up tuition and some fees after the vet has exhausted all VA and GI Bill resources.

It's the Hazelwood Amendment.
This will come in handy when I enter law school, run for the hills tax payer :grin:

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