New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

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ELB
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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#16

Post by ELB » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:00 am

I think the only real way to decide how to carry and which holster to use is to just try different positions and holsters until it meets your needs. It's a compromise between concealability, accessibility, comfort, and safety.

For me, I have carried a Glock 19 for years, and for the last 13 months, a Glock 19X. I found appendix carry with a Raven Concealment Systems Vanguard Minimalist IWB to be the best overall solution for me. I find AIWB to combine the best concealability with the best access (very smooth unobtrusive draw with right hand and I can reach it with left hand, seated or standing, or on my face with someone sitting on my back, and the best position to protect it from someone else. And it is reasonably comfortable.

The Vanguard Minimalist IWB snaps onto and fully the trigger guard, and the version I use has a strap that secures around the belt (there are other attachment options). With the gun being inside the waist band with a belt running over the top of it, it is held in position, but not rigidly -- which is an advantage for two reasons. One being comfort - it being able to shift a little bit as I stand, sit, move, roll around, whatever. It doesn't flop around, but it gives enough. Unlike many/most others, I am not trying to lock the holster and gun orientation into a single absolutely fixed spot. I trained quite a bit with a group where we regularly "attacked" each other, and I found that even the most rigidly attached holster on the stiffest belt can get knocked around -- especially if the holster is in the 3 or 4 o'clock position and you get knocked down and land on the holstered gun. If you have trained to draw from a precise point and then in the heat of the moment the gun is no longer at that point, it can introduce a hesitation while your mind sorts out what just happened. We tried to train to factor this into our draw strokes, and the AIWB position facilitates keeping the gun where it's supposed to be even when we get clobbered.

Being concerned with an inadvertent discharge on holstering is a legitimate concern. One answer is to holster SLOWLY and pay attention to what you are doing- focus on doing it correctly. If there is any hint of a problem, stop and sort it out - don't force the issue. Cops and security guards have reason to be able to holster one-handed without looking, but for the rest of us, having two hands and a visual check and "easy does it" are probably in order. This is particularly advantageous for holstering in the AIWB position.

The Vanguard holster facilitates a safe holstering since you first clip the holster onto the trigger guard, out where you can see it, completely covering the trigger guard, THEN you put it in your pants -- again with the trigger guard completely covered. Is this slower than "normal?" Yes, but so what? With practice it actually doesn't take very long.
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Middle Age Russ
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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#17

Post by Middle Age Russ » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:14 am

OP, welcome to Polite Society.

As others have said, there are many common themes regarding concealed carry. Carrying a defensive tool is meant to be comforting to the carrier, not necessarily comfortable. Your level of comfort is dependent on several factors, including a good (gun)belt, a holster that keeps the gun situated in a manner you can access it easily and clothes that allow for your chosen belt/holster to work with them.

Regarding the Belt, many have made comments and recommendations. A good gunbelt spreads the weight of the gun over a wider area around your hips and keeps the holster more stable. Beltman and AG Gunleather, among others, produce quality leather gunbelts. The Wilderness 5-stitch Instructor belt, or similar belts by 5.11 and others provide similar support using Nylon webbing.

There are many makers of fine holsters these days -- something that couldn't be said not that may years ago. For general everyday inside the waistband comfort and concealment, I settled on a hybrid holster (leather and Kydex) -- the Comp-Tac Minotaur MTAC -- years ago, and it serves me well to this day. More recently, I purchased a StealthGear holster for a different gun that has a composite material rather than leather as the backer. It still remains somewhat flexible but rigid enough to consistently allow for holstering without concern. Most folks will recommend all Kydex holsters since they do not flex at all for safety reasons. I can't argue this point, and that is why it inspect my holsters regularly to ensure that if there are potential safety issues cropping up I know about them and can take action of mitigate them.

Most folks who chose to carry concealed settle pretty early on belt/holster combos and then dress around them. If you chose an inside the waistband holster, you'll need to consistently have pants that allow for a holster inside without constricting too much. If you carry outside the waistband, you'll need shirts with plenty of tail to ensure concealment. In any case, you'll need pants with beltloops to support the wearing of the gunbelt.

Where about your waist you choose to carry is a very personal thing and your holster choice will somewhat follow. Different body types and weights will have different places that the gun tucks into more easily. AIWB holsters will be more upright or vertical (bore/slide) than will holsters carried to your side. As I said before, a large number of manufacturers are making a variety of different, quality holsters these days, including holsters with level II or level III retention mechanisms (predominantly for those who wish to open-carry.

Regardless of your choices in gun, holster, belt, clothing and where to carrry, safety should always be paramount. The first rule of firearms safety is to ALWAYS keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. Toward any body part is NEVER a safe direction. So, holstering should always be done with care that you don't direct the muzzle of the gun toward any body parts during the re-holster. I love the statement "nobody ever won a gunfight by being the first one with their gun back in their holster". AIWB requires particular care when re-holstering since things like the femoral artery are right there and we certainly don't want to be poking holes in that. Most folks will need to pull their strong-side leg back when re-holstering AIWB to avoid this very thing. I practice holstering and drawing with an empty gun (or with snap-caps) in front of a mirror, paying particular attention to where the muzzle is oriented so that I engrain habits that will not be unsafe. Additionally, where possible, I holster the gun, then put the holster(with gun) on.

When holstering, the other thing to be careful about is the bang-switch. As the gun travels down into the holster, anything getting in the way of that travel -- clothing, accessory, holster flap, etc... -- could actuate the trigger, causing a very loud noise (and potentially a lot of other undesirable consequences depending on how well you follow Rule #1). Ensure that your clothing is out of the way and that the holster is in good repair, and, when possible, visually observe the area as you are re-holstering.

Good luck and stay safe.
Russ
Stay aware and engaged. Awareness buys time; time buys options. Survival may require moving quickly past the Observe, Orient and Decide steps to ACT.
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The Annoyed Man
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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#18

Post by The Annoyed Man » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:36 am

TheSoundGrip wrote:
Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:19 pm
My current setup is a G19 with a CYA gun-molded IWB holster....
I have two of that same CYA holster for a G19 and a for a G26. I also have one just like it that my son made for me, for a G43. I regularly Appendix carry the 26 and 43 in those holsters. I almost never carry the 19 that way, as it is a little too long for comfort when sitting. So I end up carrying my 19 either OWB in my left hip (I’m a southpaw) in a leather pancake holster or in a shoulder holster.
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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#19

Post by flechero » Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:13 am

montgomery wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:23 am
Comfortable has nothing to do with carrying a firearm. I have been carrying all day every day for over 30 years. Comfortable has never been part of the equation.
While I understand what you are saying and agree it's not the main focus - there is no reason that comfort can't be a part of carrying.

There is no reason, IMO, to be physically uncomfortable when carrying. I understand that for many, it can be mildly uncomfortable until you get used to it, and find correct position, cant and holsters but that shouldn't be a permanent condition. I have a number of gun/holster combinations that are very comfortable and no less effective than the uncomfortable ones. In fact, I rarely even remove my holster/gun (worn 8 o'clock [lefty]) when I lay down to nap on weekends.

:tiphat:


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#20

Post by eyedoc » Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:42 am

crazy2medic wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 6:41 am
I carry openly most of the time, mostly because it's more comfortable and the shirt helps keep the safety from poking me in the side, I'm left handed so gun is at my 9:00 position. I carry a full size 1911 with double stack mags, I found that a really good gun belt is the key to carrying comfortable, it needs to be a gun belt! Mine is 1 3/4" wide, this keeps the gun tucked right to my side, I have a single mag and holder on the opposite side with 14rd reload. Comfort is relative, can be a combination of things, position, gun belt, even the pants can make a difference I wear wrangle jeans because of the position of the belt loops, try different combinations see what works for you! Good luck, stay vigilant, welcome to the forum!
Good taste in pistols. I carry a Para 10 mm at 3 o'clock when OWB or at 5 when IWB.


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#21

Post by WTR » Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:25 pm

Buy a good gun belt and a holster you like ( I started out with Crossbreed and couldn’t be happier). Also, try not to constantly check your carry and give your self away. Just trust the carry combo you choose.


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#22

Post by montgomery » Wed Jun 19, 2019 1:19 pm

flechero wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:13 am
montgomery wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:23 am
Comfortable has nothing to do with carrying a firearm. I have been carrying all day every day for over 30 years. Comfortable has never been part of the equation.
While I understand what you are saying and agree it's not the main focus - there is no reason that comfort can't be a part of carrying.

There is no reason, IMO, to be physically uncomfortable when carrying. I understand that for many, it can be mildly uncomfortable until you get used to it, and find correct position, cant and holsters but that shouldn't be a permanent condition. I have a number of gun/holster combinations that are very comfortable and no less effective than the uncomfortable ones. In fact, I rarely even remove my holster/gun (worn 8 o'clock [lefty]) when I lay down to nap on weekends.

:tiphat:
Reading your post is all the comfort I need. :cheers2:


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#23

Post by flechero » Wed Jun 19, 2019 1:23 pm

montgomery wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 1:19 pm
flechero wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:13 am
montgomery wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:23 am
Comfortable has nothing to do with carrying a firearm. I have been carrying all day every day for over 30 years. Comfortable has never been part of the equation.
While I understand what you are saying and agree it's not the main focus - there is no reason that comfort can't be a part of carrying.

There is no reason, IMO, to be physically uncomfortable when carrying. I understand that for many, it can be mildly uncomfortable until you get used to it, and find correct position, cant and holsters but that shouldn't be a permanent condition. I have a number of gun/holster combinations that are very comfortable and no less effective than the uncomfortable ones. In fact, I rarely even remove my holster/gun (worn 8 o'clock [lefty]) when I lay down to nap on weekends.

:tiphat:
Reading your post is all the comfort I need. :cheers2:
:lol: Glad to ease the pain!

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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#24

Post by RoyGBiv » Wed Jun 19, 2019 2:34 pm

RoyGBiv wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:38 am
Jusme wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:35 am
No one has ever won a gun fight by being the first one with their gun back in their holster.
Truth. And funny. :lol:
Here's a timely article from the NRA magazine.
https://www.shootingillustrated.com/art ... -bad-idea/

PS... Join the NRA if you haven't already.
PPS... This is my favorite appendix holster. https://www.jmcustomkydex.com/p/AIWB-WC2.htm (I prefer the clip)
I am not a lawyer. This is NOT legal advice.!
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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#25

Post by Lynyrd » Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:22 pm

TheSoundGrip wrote:
Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:19 pm
I will occasionally carry a round in the chamber, but it's normally when I am carrying 3'o clock IWB or in my OWB holster and while at the range. Anyone else have this anxiety at first? How'd you overcome it? I am confident in my own gun safety practice while carrying and do exercise caution while holstering, but it's kinda just the thought that I've got something that fires a projectile at around 1500 ft./s pointing towards my body that I am just not used to yet...especially when I'm carrying appendix with a firearm pointed at my...appendages. Any advice?

Thanks
Your anxiety is born of a lack of familiarity and practice. And I think that is normal. We all know that one in the pipe is the proper way to carry, but for the inexperienced that seems a little dangerous at first. If you have a hard sided holster (leather, kydex, or something similar) as long as the gun is in the holster with the trigger covered their is little chance of an ND. Unholstering and reholstering is where you need to be very, very careful. If you are in environments where you must disarm frequently I would probably try to take the holster off with the gun still in it. Luckily for me, I put my gun in the holster first thing in the morning and most every day it doesn't come back out until I go to bed.

As for carry position and comfort, it's hard to beat 3:00 for a right hander and 9:00 for a left hander. Just figure out what works for you. The cant of your holster will make a big difference in comfort too. Set it to different angles at first until you find out what is most comfortable for you. And like others have said, a good gun belt is essential.
Do what you say you're gonna do.


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#26

Post by Terry » Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:52 pm

Wow this thread has garnered a wealth of information. Thank you to those taking time to type up their experience and advice.

I dont know if I ever muster the courage to carry chambered tbh. Right now I carry off body because of work attire constraints (tucked in business casual). Definitely need a lot of practice.


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#27

Post by WTR » Wed Jun 19, 2019 4:00 pm

Terry wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:52 pm
Wow this thread has garnered a wealth of information. Thank you to those taking time to type up their experience and advice.

I dont know if I ever muster the courage to carry chambered tbh. Right now I carry off body because of work attire constraints (tucked in business casual). Definitely need a lot of practice.
If you are concerned about a round in the chamber, I would carry a weapon such as a 1911 which has more safeties envoled before a round may be discharged.


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#28

Post by crazy2medic » Wed Jun 19, 2019 4:48 pm

eyedoc wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:42 am
crazy2medic wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 6:41 am
I carry openly most of the time, mostly because it's more comfortable and the shirt helps keep the safety from poking me in the side, I'm left handed so gun is at my 9:00 position. I carry a full size 1911 with double stack mags, I found that a really good gun belt is the key to carrying comfortable, it needs to be a gun belt! Mine is 1 3/4" wide, this keeps the gun tucked right to my side, I have a single mag and holder on the opposite side with 14rd reload. Comfort is relative, can be a combination of things, position, gun belt, even the pants can make a difference I wear wrangle jeans because of the position of the belt loops, try different combinations see what works for you! Good luck, stay vigilant, welcome to the forum!
Good taste in pistols. I carry a Para 10 mm at 3 o'clock when OWB or at 5 when IWB.
:tiphat:
Government, like fire is a dangerous servant and a fearful master
If you ain't paranoid you ain't paying attention

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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#29

Post by Middle Age Russ » Thu Jun 20, 2019 9:40 am

I dont know if I ever muster the courage to carry chambered tbh. Right now I carry off body because of work attire constraints (tucked in business casual). Definitely need a lot of practice.
If a gun is in its holster, there is so little chance of a discharge that it should pose no concern at all. The only concerns are the acts of holstering or drawing the firearm from the holster, and these can be mitigated by training, attention, process (whether you put the holster on and then the gun in the holster, or whether you holster the gun first then put the combination on) and, as some have suggested, mechanical safeties. I prefer no extra mechanical safety on the defensive firearm myself, but I understand why others have a different preference.

Carrying while in business casual attire is fairly easy -- as long as your shirts are not too fitted around the waist and your pants leave room for the gun/holster around the waist. Several companies make tuckable holsters to fit this need -- CompTac has a few, Crossbreed SuperTuck, Galco King Tuk, etc...


Training and practice are always a good idea for everyone.
Russ
Stay aware and engaged. Awareness buys time; time buys options. Survival may require moving quickly past the Observe, Orient and Decide steps to ACT.
NRA Life Member, CRSO, Basic Pistol, PPITH & PPOTH Instructor, Texas 4-H Certified Pistol & Rifle Coach, Texas LTC Instructor


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Re: New to Concealed Carry, have a few questions

#30

Post by LDP » Thu Jun 20, 2019 10:52 am

Middle Age Russ wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2019 9:40 am
Training and practice are always a good idea for everyone.
AMEN!!!

I have been preaching this for years but people don't usually listen.

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