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Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:14 pm
by Killadocg23
Any body in th AutoCad/drafting field. Was just looking at picking up another trade and I can eat a certificate in it with just three classes. Just curious if it’s even worth it.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:54 pm
by montgomery
Killadocg23 wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:14 pm
Any body in th AutoCad/drafting field. Was just looking at picking up another trade and I can eat a certificate in it with just three classes. Just curious if it’s even worth it.
Unless you are doing electrical schematics, consider learning parametric and relational solid modeling - SolidWorks is easy to learn, a marketable skill, and the software cost does not break the bank. I have not seen AutoCad used regularly since 1990.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 2:05 pm
by clarionite
montgomery wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:54 pm
Killadocg23 wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:14 pm
Any body in th AutoCad/drafting field. Was just looking at picking up another trade and I can eat a certificate in it with just three classes. Just curious if it’s even worth it.
Unless you are doing electrical schematics, consider learning parametric and relational solid modeling - SolidWorks is easy to learn, a marketable skill, and the software cost does not break the bank. I have not seen AutoCad used regularly since 1990.
I worked with it in the mid 90's as a draftsman for a furniture factory. The last version I worked with was version 12. I really enjoyed the work, but there's no way I could live on the salary of a draftsman. The pay was very weak.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 2:12 pm
by WTR
montgomery wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:54 pm
Killadocg23 wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:14 pm
Any body in th AutoCad/drafting field. Was just looking at picking up another trade and I can eat a certificate in it with just three classes. Just curious if it’s even worth it.
Unless you are doing electrical schematics, consider learning parametric and relational solid modeling - SolidWorks is easy to learn, a marketable skill, and the software cost does not break the bank. I have not seen AutoCad used regularly since 1990.
My BIL was a design engineer with Peterbuilt. AutoCad was used extensively. I also will scan openings in Constuction related fields. Experience with AutoCad is often listed as a requirement, or at the very least a plus.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 2:19 pm
by WildBill
Killadocg23 wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:14 pm
Any body in th AutoCad/drafting field. Was just looking at picking up another trade and I can eat a certificate in it with just three classes. Just curious if it’s even worth it.
From what I have observed [NASA, DOD and Offshore work] is that the people using the software do some/or most of the design work, not just the drawing portion.
As another person pointed out I think Solid Works is used more than AutoCad. All in all, it's a good set of skills to have. even if it just teaches you how to read a drawing.
Knowledge /a class in GD&T is also a useful skill.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 2:26 pm
by WTR
A friend who was an Electrical/Mechanical Endineer died recently of Cancer. My friends AutoCad man was in very high demand from other Engineering offices.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 5:06 pm
by philip964
Rivit is the new in demand drafting/modeling software.
It is made by Autocad.

You create a 3d model and with some button clicks, the program creates the 2d drawings you would normally draw a line at a time.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 6:40 pm
by Killadocg23
Thank you gents. I just found it Interesting. I spoke to a few of my buddies who suggest just getting a certificate in auto cad. One has about 7 years experience and no degree what so ever and make 35 an hour here in corpus drawing piping for the refineries. Another buddy works in Austin at an engineering firm and make about 70k or so. They aware telling me to jump on the train. I did a bit of technical drawing in school as well.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 7:21 pm
by Vol Texan
My wife doesn't use AutoCad, but she does do 3D CAD design of jewelry in her shop here in Houston. It has really upped her game a lot - and her business is booming because of it.
I say this because there are more uses to CAD than just the ones mentioned above. It's a marketable skill that can (with a bit of practice) be applied across a number of industries.
3D printing is getting bigger and bigger these days. How are those models built? In 3D CAD software packages!

I'd say, "yes", if three classes can get you a cert, then it can't be bad for your resume. And, if you think a bit broader, you might find yourself in a whole new industry.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 7:34 pm
by WTR
My friend has no formal education. However, he has 30 years of practical experience.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 8:27 pm
by Killadocg23
I really appreciate the replies gentleman , I really do ! Happy shooting and God bless you all !

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 8:28 pm
by Killadocg23
Killadocg23 wrote:
Thu Jul 25, 2019 6:40 pm
Thank you gents. I just found it Interesting. I spoke to a few of my buddies who suggest just getting a certificate in auto cad. One has about 7 years experience and no degree what so ever and make 35 an hour here in corpus drawing piping for the refineries. Another buddy works in Austin at an engineering firm and make about 70k or so. They are telling me to jump on the train. I did a bit of technical drawing in school as well.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2019 9:15 pm
by jason812
In my previous line of work, we used AutoCad for facility layout. It was handy for laying out work cells, keeping track of where the over head cranes traveled, and knowing what we had to move for new equipment.

Creo (formally ProE) was what was used for product development, fixture design, prints, and making 3D models.

Esprit was used for programming the machining centers and the Creo models were imported for this.

What software a company uses and what you are experienced in using will play a role in where you can end up working. I always said if you can use one, you can figure the others out.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Fri Jul 26, 2019 5:56 pm
by The Annoyed Man
My son is a CNC Machine programmer, and uses CAD all the time. It’s a valuable skill set to have, particularly if you can output your work into machine code, and know how to edit the code directly if need be. But I doubt you can get beyond the basics in just 3 days.

Re: Auto Cad

Posted: Fri Jul 26, 2019 6:37 pm
by Killadocg23
Thanks a lot gents !